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dc.contributor.authorRosenberg, Philippeen_US
dc.contributor.editorDevereaux, S.
dc.contributor.editorGriffiths, P.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-27T11:04:31Z
dc.date.available2019-04-27T11:04:31Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781349432691
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/50978
dc.descriptionChapter 6en_US
dc.description.abstractIt has become almost commonplace to treat punishment as a self-contained sociological phenomenon to be interpreted in terms of sentences or patterns of prosecution. Unfortunately, this widespread approach tends to overlook how punitive power itself has been understood. Much like its ancient and medieval predecessors, modern punishment is supported by a set of rituals, rationales and explanations that serve to legitimize it. This symbolic apparatus not only underwrites punishment, but also marks it off as something distinct from ‘mere’ violence. Rationales are therefore every bit as crucial to the sociology of punishment as are the severity of sanctions, the frequency of punitive action, or the legal machinery that surround its application.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPenal practice and culture, 1500–1900 punishing the englishen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1057/9780230523241_7en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1057/9780230523241en_US
dc.subjectEighteenth centuryen_US
dc.subjectSeventeenth centuryen_US
dc.subjectBritish isleen_US
dc.subjectCorporal punishmenten_US
dc.subjectRetributive justiceen_US
dc.titleSanctifying the robe: Punitive violence and the English press, 1650–1700en_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentProgram in Cultures, Civilization and Ideasen_US
dc.citation.spage157en_US
dc.citation.epage182en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/9780230523241_7en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/9780230523241en_US
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan, Londonen_US


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