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dc.contributor.authorKorab‐Karpowicz, W. Julianen_US
dc.contributor.editorVandenabeele, B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-22T07:36:10Z
dc.date.available2019-04-22T07:36:10Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781405171038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/50861
dc.descriptionChapter 12
dc.description.abstractIn contrast to the philosophers who can be associated with the classical tradition that goes back to Plato and Aristotle, Schopenhauer rejected the view that human actions could be subject to the direction of a controlling and dispassionate intellect, capable of molding our character. He regarded human beings as embodiments of will. For him, the will was “the substance of man, the intellect the accident”. Like Thomas Hobbes, he affirmed the priority of passions, of will, over reason.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofA Companion to Schopenhaueren_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1002/9781444347579.ch12
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1002/9781444347579
dc.subjectSchopenhauer's theory of architectureen_US
dc.subjectSchopenhauer's architectonic idealismen_US
dc.subjectThe will and modernityen_US
dc.subjectClassical and the gothicen_US
dc.titleSchopenhauer’s theory of architectureen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.citation.spage178en_US
dc.citation.epage192en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/9781444347579.ch12
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/9781444347579
dc.publisherWiley‐Blackwellen_US
dc.identifier.eisbn9781444347579


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