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dc.contributor.authorÇuhadar, Esraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDruckman, D.en_US
dc.contributor.editorGalluccio, M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-19T06:27:18Z
dc.date.available2019-04-19T06:27:18Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9783319106861
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/50841
dc.descriptionChapter 1
dc.description.abstractAn attempt is made in this chapter to evaluate hypotheses derived from democratic peace theory. The key tenet of this theory is that democratic nations do not go to war with other democracies. Thus, regime type drives decisions to pursue war. The research to date has focused attention on regime type. This study expands this focus by examining the influences of a variety of variables on decisions made by role players to mobilize for war. In addition to own and other’s regime type, we include motivational, readiness, and identity variables. Further, the study examines two types of decisions: response to threats of violence and response to a humanitarian crisis in another country. The results show that the other’s regime motivates decisions to go to war when that nation is autocratic. However, that decision is contingent on the severity of the threat and the spread of public support for the action. The other’s regime type is not a source of decisions to act in humanitarian crises. The key factor in that situation is spread of support for the action. Interestingly, one’s own regime type (democracy) is the most important influence on both types of decisions when the other nation is democratic. These findings expand and refine democratic peace theory as well as provide a basis for further research.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHandbook of international negotiation: interpersonal, intercultural, and diplomatic perspectivesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-10687-8_1en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-10687-8en_US
dc.subjectDemocratic peace theoryen_US
dc.subjectHumanitarian crisesen_US
dc.subjectRegime typeen_US
dc.subjectSeverity of threaten_US
dc.subjectSpread of supporten_US
dc.subjectViolent threatsen_US
dc.titleRepresentative decision-making: challenges to democratic peace theoryen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage3en_US
dc.citation.epage14en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-10687-8_1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-10687-8en_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.identifier.eisbn9783319106878


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