Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDemirtürk, E. L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-25T05:53:44Z
dc.date.available2019-01-25T05:53:44Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.issn0026-637X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/48337
dc.description.abstractPart of a special issue on Richard Wright. Race is the basic element of the discourse of difference that pervades interracial relations. Wright's Native Son addresses the dire consequences of the whites' image-formation of blacks as it analyzes the role of perception in interracial relations. Stereotypical images of blacks that have been part of colonialist discourse are also part of the white stereotyping of Bigger Thomas. Bigger's violent killing of the rat in the opening scenes of the novel juxtaposes Bigger's anger with the rat's fear. Having become a murderer in order not to enact the white myth of the black rapist, Bigger is trapped by police in the closing scenes of the novel and becomes the rat whose final cry of defiance is to no avail. Unlike the rat at the beginning, however, he is able to attack both physically and mentally at the end.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleThe Mississippi Quarterlyen_US
dc.subjectCriticism and interpretationen_US
dc.subjectNative Son (Wright, Richard) (Novel)en_US
dc.titleMastering the master's tongue: bigger as oppressor in Richard Wright's native sonen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of American Culture and Literatureen_US
dc.citation.spage267en_US
dc.citation.epage276en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber50en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.publisherMississippi State Universityen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record