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dc.contributor.authorWinter, T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-24T15:01:51Z
dc.date.available2019-01-24T15:01:51Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.issn1552-6828
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/48315
dc.description.abstractHistorians have largely neglected to explore the ways in which emerging constructions of middle-class manhood were contingent on defining and structuring class difference. Using the YMCA's efforts with railroad and industrial workers from the 1870s to the end of World War I as a case study, the author argues that definitions of class difference were an integral part to new articulations of middle-class manhood. YMCA officials hoped that workingmen would abstain from political radicalism and industrial unrest once they adopted an ideal of Christian manhood. Bringing an ideal of Christian manhood to the workers, the YMCA presumed, could engender a workforce that would set examples of sacrifice and service and exude goodwill and selflessness. While YMCA officials took part in the remaking of middle-class men's notions about the meaning of manhood, they also constructed and affirmed class differences through their cultural practices.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleMen and Masculinitiesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1177%2F1097184X00002003002en_US
dc.subjectManhooden_US
dc.subjectSocial classen_US
dc.subjectYMCAen_US
dc.subjectPersonalityen_US
dc.subjectCharacteren_US
dc.subjectGilded ageen_US
dc.subjectProgressive Eraen_US
dc.subjectWorld War Ien_US
dc.titlePersonality, character, and self-expression: the YMCA and the construction of manhood and class, 1877-1920en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of American Culture and Literatureen_US
dc.citation.spage272en_US
dc.citation.epage285en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber2en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177%2F1097184X00002003002en_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.en_US


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