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dc.contributor.authorMansbridge, J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T13:53:00Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T13:53:00Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.issn0026-7694
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/38329
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the way John Guare’s A Free Man of Color (2010) mobilizes a metatheatrical aesthetic to question the methods we use to organize our understandings of the past and formulate our projections of the future. Looking specifically at George C. Wolfe’s production at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theatre and drawing on the work of Reinhart Koselleck and Ernst Bloch, the article shows how Guare’s densely textured epic stages a metatheatrical duel between two competing forces of history: one grounded in Enlightenment notions of progress (rational, linear, forward movement), the other in utopia (an imagined future always on the horizon). As progress and utopia jostle for the authority to define the history – and so also the future – that the play re-enacts, it becomes clear to the audience that what is at stake, in our present, is the meanings and practices of citizenship, race, sexuality, and class that history defines.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleModern Dramaen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3138/md.0729en_US
dc.subjectAffecten_US
dc.subjectGeorge C. Wolfeen_US
dc.subjectJohn Guareen_US
dc.subjectMetatheatreen_US
dc.subjectProgressen_US
dc.subjectUtopiaen_US
dc.titleRacing toward history: Utopia and progress in John Guare’s a free man of coloren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of American Culture and Literatureen_US
dc.citation.spage413en_US
dc.citation.epage436en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber58en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber4en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3138/md.0729en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Toronto Pressen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1712-5286


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