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dc.contributor.authorBrahm, G. N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, F. G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T13:52:54Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T13:52:54Zen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.issn0891-9356
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/38322en_US
dc.description.abstractThough Mark Twain and Friedrich Nietzsche were aware of each other, they never met and there is no evidence of influence in either direction. Yet the similarities in their thought are strikingly numerous and close. They were both penetrating psychologists who shared Sigmund Freud's interest in the unconscious and his misgiving about the future of civilization. Both regarded Christianity as a leading symptom of the world's madness, manifest in a slavish morality of good and evil and in a widespread subjection to irrational guilt. They were at one in lamenting the pervasive human surrender to varieties of evasion, disavowel, deceit, and self-deception. Other, lesser similarities abound in thought, style, and patterns of literary production. © 2005 by The Regents of the University of California.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleNineteenth-Century Literatureen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1525/ncl.2005.60.2.137en_US
dc.subjectGenealogyen_US
dc.subjectWritersen_US
dc.subjectGuilten_US
dc.subjectChristian moralityen_US
dc.subjectRessentimenten_US
dc.subjectSlavesen_US
dc.subjectNineteenth century literatureen_US
dc.subjectNietzschean philosophyen_US
dc.titleThe Jester and the Sage: Twain and Nietzscheen_US
dc.typeReviewen_US
dc.departmentProgram in Cultures, Civilizations and Ideasen_US
dc.citation.spage137en_US
dc.citation.epage162en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber60en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1525/ncl.2005.60.2.137en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of California Pressen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1067-8352


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