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dc.contributor.authorKurtuluş, Meriçen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T10:59:05Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T10:59:05Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.issn1300-3984
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/36982
dc.description.abstractThe Book of Travels of Evliya Çelebi is a polyphonic narrative in which different genres such as biography, fiction and history intertwine with each other. Evliya’s Seyahatnâme, which encompasses a large spectrum of subject matter and world-wide geography, is a significant source for researchers coming from different academic disciplines. In this article it was dwelled on how hospitals were depicted and the issue of madness was reflected in Seyahatnâme. The article mainly centered on chapters depicting the hospitals in Edirne and Egypt. In the first part of the article the lexical meanings of bîmârhâne, bîmâristân and tîmârhâne have been discussed and it has been briefly touched on the architectural structure of the Ottoman hospital and the method of its management. It is aimed to discover the differences between the Ottoman hospitals and modern hospitals and demonstrate that the differences between these medical institutions actually depend on the difference of mentality. Indeed the pre-modern Ottoman mentality, which bears the traces of the medieval worldview, didn’t define madness with a marginalised point of view unlike the Western modernity. The early modern hospitals were built at the center of the city, which was another sign of the symbiotic lifestyle of the Ottoman society. In the last two parts of the article it is analysed how madness was depicted and defined in the Seyahatnâme. Therefore, the works of Michael Dols and Eyüp Öztürk and the biographical anthology of Enfî Hasan Hulûs Halvetî was benefited as theoretical and informative sources. Furthermore, some of the mystics introduced in the anthology of Enfî Hasan Ağa have been found in Seyahatnâme, as well. Finally, it is revealed that Evliya divided madmen into two groups as melancholic people (majnun) and mystic majzubs in his Book of Travels. In other words, it is understood that both lyric and sufistic meanings have been attributed to madness in Seyahatnâme.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleMilli Folkloren_US
dc.subjectBook of travelsen_US
dc.subjectBîmârhâneen_US
dc.subjectMajnunen_US
dc.subjectMajzuben_US
dc.subjectMelancholyen_US
dc.titleThe majzubs and majnuns in the ottoman state: A glance into the ottoman hospitals and madness in the early modern perioden_US
dc.title.alternativeOsmanlı'nın meczûblari ve mecnûnlari: erken modern dönemde hastaneler ve deliliğe bakışen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Turkish Literatureen_US
dc.citation.spage100en_US
dc.citation.epage113en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber2016en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber110en_US
dc.publisherMilli Folklor Dergisien_US


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