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dc.contributor.authorHazer F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEyikan, B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:43:37Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:43:37Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.issn0013-9165
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/25366
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the attitudes of studio instructors in architecture and landscape architecture departments throughout the United States toward the designer's role, sources of knowledge and inspiration in design, related disciplines, and essential skills. A cluster analysis of instructors' responses to a questionnaire identified five groups according to conceptions of professional identity: master designers, communicative designers, political designers, researcher designers, and those who see design, research, and political skills as almost equally important. The two most common self-conceptions are "master" and "negotiator." In-depth interviews with some instructors further elucidated each approach. The results revealed the coexistence of a multiplicity of ideas and convictions within a shared ethos and suggested various strategies for increasing the effectiveness of design education and practice. The article concludes that the professional identity of designers is being transformed from that of isolated creative individuals to that of politically active professionals.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleEnvironment and Behavioren_US
dc.titleStudio instructors talk about skills, knowledge, and professional roles in architecture and landscape architectureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Urban Design and Landscape Architecture
dc.citation.spage378en_US
dc.citation.epage397en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber30en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.publisherSageen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1552-390X


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