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dc.contributor.authorHeper, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGüney, A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:38:10Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:38:10Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.issn0095-327X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/25041
dc.description.abstractTurkey's recent success in dealing with the threat of political Islam without the military taking power into its own hands cannot be explained by either of the two contending theories about the military's role in the consolidation of democracy, that of the "mode-of-transition" or that of "electoral dynamics." Following the transition to democracy, officers in Latin America have evinced politically elite characteristics and have been in a tug of war with civilian politicians; officers in Eastern Europe have shown non-elite (professional) characteristics and have been subordinated to civilian politicians; officers in Turkey, not unlike their counterparts in France and Germany of earlier decades, have displayed state-elite characteristics and maintained their privileged position in the polity. Thus, while it is possible to use the dichotomy of politicized versus professional militaries to explain the fortunes of democracy in Latin America and Eastern Europe, respectively, in Turkey it is necessary to analyze the factors determining the orientation of officers toward democracy.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleArmed Forces and Societyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0095327X0002600407en_US
dc.titleThe military and the consolidation of democracy: the recent Turkish experienceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.citation.spage635en_US
dc.citation.epage657en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber26en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber4en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0095327X0002600407en_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.en_US


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