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dc.contributor.authorAdelman, I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYeldan, E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:37:59Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:37:59Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.issn0954-349X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/25027
dc.description.abstractThe paper reviews the policies and institutions used by governments that have successfully promoted economic development. It examines which policy instruments countries can still wield in the current global trading and financial regimes. It concludes that the openness and nature of short-term financial markets eliminate state use of interest and exchange rate policies while GATT/WHO eliminate trade and commercial policy. As a result, developing countries are severely limited in the means they can employ to promote development. We conclude by suggesting four reforms to increase state autonomy and lessen the frequency and severity of financial crises. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleStructural Change and Economic Dynamicsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0954-349X(99)00019-3en_US
dc.subjectEconomic developmenten_US
dc.subjectEconomic dynamics and structural changeen_US
dc.subjectGlobal financial systemsen_US
dc.subjectMacroeconomic policyen_US
dc.subjectDevelopment strategyen_US
dc.subjectEconomic planningen_US
dc.subjectPolicy strategyen_US
dc.subjectStructural changeen_US
dc.titleIs this the end of economic development?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Economicsen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.citation.spage95en_US
dc.citation.epage109en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber11en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1-2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0954-349X(99)00019-3en_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1873-6017


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