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dc.contributor.authorBilgin, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorton, A. D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:33:46Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:33:46Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-6597
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/24745
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the rise of various representations of post-colonial states to highlight how thinking and practice that arose and prevailed during the Cold War still persists in the present ostensibly post-cold war era. After initially outlining the historical construction of the social sciences, it is shown how the annexation of the social sciences evolved in the early post-World War II and cold-war era as an adjunct of the world hegemonic pretensions of the USA. A critique is then developed of various representations of post-colonial states that arose in the making of the 'Third World' during the cold-war annexation of the social sciences. Yet such practices still persist in the present, as evidenced by more contemporary representations of post-colonial states commonly revolving around elements of deficiency or failure, eg 'quasi-states', 'weak states', 'failed states' or 'rogue states'. A more historicised consideration of post-colonial statehood, that recasts conceptions of state-civil society antagonisms in terms of an appreciation of political economy and critical security concerns, offers an alternative to these representations of 'failed states'. By historicising various representations of 'failed states' it becomes possible to open up critical ways of thinking about the political economy of security and to consider alternative futures in the world order.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleThird World Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01436590220108172en_US
dc.subjectAcademic researchen_US
dc.subjectPost-Cold Waren_US
dc.subjectSocial constructionen_US
dc.subjectState-local relationsen_US
dc.titleHistoricising representations of 'failed states': beyond the cold-war annexation of the social sciences?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage55en_US
dc.citation.epage80en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber23en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01436590220108172en_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US


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