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dc.contributor.authorKaraosmanoǧlu, A.L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:14:09Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:14:09Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.issn13047310
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/23454
dc.description.abstractKant and Clausewitz, the two great authors of the Enlightenment as well as of the Counter-Enlightenment, still play an important role in the theory of International Relations. The former continues to inspire Liberals and the latter Realists. Both authors, however, have often been subject to superficial interpretations; and they are regarded as representing two diametrically opposed schools of thought. Yet, they have a significant shared sphere of reasoning and conceptualization. Kant's "Perpetual Peace" and Clausewitzs "Absolute War" are abstractions, purely unattainable ideals, which make theorizing possible. In the final analysis, both authors meet in an attempt to reconcile the ideal with the real through reasonable politics suggesting, inter alia, a certain moral obligation to limit violence; in modern terminology, the management of the "Security Dilemma".en_US
dc.language.isoTurkishen_US
dc.source.titleUluslararasi Iliskileren_US
dc.subjectClausewitzen_US
dc.subjectKanten_US
dc.subjectPeaceen_US
dc.subjectSecurityen_US
dc.subjectWaren_US
dc.titleA magnificent partnership: Kant and Clausewitzen_US
dc.title.alternativeMuhteşem ortaklιk: Kant ve Clausewitzen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relations
dc.citation.spage161en_US
dc.citation.epage183en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber4en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber14en_US


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