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dc.contributor.authorBilgin, P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:10:20Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:10:20Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-6597
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/23209
dc.description.abstractThe laudable attempts at thinking past 'Western' IR should not limit their task to looking beyond the spatial confines of the 'West' in search for insight understood as 'difference', but also ask awkward questions about the 'Westernness' of ostensibly 'Western' approaches to world politics and the 'non-Westernness' of others. For there may be elements of 'non-Western' experiences and ideas built in to 'Western' ways of thinking about and doing world politics. The reverse may also be true. What we think of as 'non-Western' approaches to world politics may be suffused with 'Western' concepts and theories. Indeed, those who are interested in thinking past 'Western' IR should take an additional step and inquire into the evolution of the latter. While looking beyond the 'West' may not always involve discovering something that is radically 'different' from one's own ways of thinking about and doing world politics, such seeming absence of 'difference' cannot be explained away through invoking assumptions of 'teleological Westernisation', but requires becoming curious about the effects of the historical relationship between the 'West' and the 'non-West' in the emergence of ways of thinking and doing that are - in Bhabha's words - 'almost the same but not quite'. This article looks at three such instances (India's search for nuclear power status, Turkey's turn to secularism, and Asia's integration into the liberal world order) in the attempt to illustrate how 'mimicry' may emerge as a way of 'doing' world politics in a seemingly 'similar' yet unexpectedly 'different' way.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleThird World Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01436590701726392en_US
dc.subjectGeopoliticsen_US
dc.subjectInternational relationsen_US
dc.subjectWestern worlden_US
dc.subjectWesternizationen_US
dc.titleThinking past 'Western' IR?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage5en_US
dc.citation.epage23en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber29en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01436590701726392en_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US


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