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dc.contributor.authorDurrant, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:04:12Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:04:12Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn0019-042X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/22742
dc.description.abstractUsage-based models claim that first language learning is based on the frequency-based analysis of memorised phrases. It is not clear though, whether adult second language learning works in the same way. It has been claimed that non-native language lacks idiomatic formulas, suggesting that learners neglect phrases, focusing instead on orthographic words. While a number of studies challenge the claim that non-native language lacks formulaicity, these studies have two important shortcomings: they fail to take account of appropriate frequency information and they pool the writing of different learners in ways that may mask individual differences. Using methodologies which avoid these problems, this study found that non-native writers rely heavily on high-frequency collocations, but that they underuse less frequent, strongly associated collocations (items which are probably highly salient for native speakers). These findings are consistent with usage-based models of acquisition while accounting for the impression that non-native writing lacks idiomatic phraseology.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleIRAL - International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teachingen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1515/iral.2009.007en_US
dc.titleTo what extent do native and non-native writers make use of collocations?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentGraduate School of Educationen_US
dc.citation.spage157en_US
dc.citation.epage177en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber47en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/iral.2009.007en_US
dc.publisherDe Gruyter Moutonen_US


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