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dc.contributor.authorEkinci, D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:04:07Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:04:07Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn13047310
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/22735
dc.description.abstractWhile fully engaged in efforts of suppressing the armed violence in the former Yugoslavia at the turn of the century, Ankara could foresee the coming events, repeatedly called for immediate multilateral action, and argued adamantly about who the aggressor and victim were as opposed to the relevant ambiguity in the West. Central to policy formulations at political parties were Turkey's Balkan heritage/identity, stance against aggression, and the significance of Balkan routes for Turkey. Drawing upon detailed empirical data obtained from parliamentary discussions in three frames, this study examines under which circumstances the Turkish 'state', its identity, interests and intersubjectivities were at work shaping Turkey's foreign policy towards Bosnia. Finally, it is emphasized that Ankara's foreign policy towards the war was competent despite coalition governments composed of different political mainstreams.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleUluslararasi Iliskileren_US
dc.subjectBosnia-Herzegovinaen_US
dc.subjectParliamenten_US
dc.subjectSerbiaen_US
dc.subjectTurkeyen_US
dc.subjectUNen_US
dc.titleThe war in bosnia-herzegovina and turkish parliamentary debates (1992-1995): A constructivist approachen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.citation.spage37en_US
dc.citation.epage60en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber6en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber22en_US


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