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dc.contributor.authorWigley, S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:03:13Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:03:13Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn0275-0392
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/22674
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the effect that shielding elected representatives from criminal law might have in those countries that are undergoing democratization. Parliamentary immunity helps to compensate for any shortfall in the human rights enjoyed by ordinary citizens and provides elected representatives with the protection necessary to rectify that shortfall. However, the immunity may also protect subversive advocacy, rights violations and political corruption. Turkey provides an illuminating case study of those challenges to parliamentary immunity. Drawing on the Turkish experience, it is argued that methods other than exposing parliamentarians to criminal prosecution should be used to counter those problems.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleHuman Rights Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1353/hrq.0.0087en_US
dc.subjectAdvocacyen_US
dc.subjectCorruptionen_US
dc.subjectDemocratizationen_US
dc.subjectHuman rightsen_US
dc.subjectPolitical changeen_US
dc.subjectPolitical systemen_US
dc.subjectTurkeyen_US
dc.titleParliamentary immunity in democratizing countries: the case of Turkeyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Philosophyen_US
dc.citation.spage567en_US
dc.citation.epage591en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber31en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/hrq.0.0087en_US
dc.publisherThe Johns Hopkins University Pressen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1085-794Xen_US


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