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dc.contributor.advisorRaw, Laurence A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSoleimani Ardekani, Maryamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T20:09:50Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T20:09:50Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/17387
dc.descriptionAnkara : Faculty of Humanities and Letters and the Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent University, 1992.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1992.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references leaves [41]-44.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe notion of religion in the western world seems to have undergone a radical change in the twentieth century; the individual, instead of cherishing an orthodox belief in God, has rather preferred to develop a "private myth" of his/her own, which is in fact engendered by the individual's obsessions. Peter Shaffer frequently displays such an obsession with myth/religion in his plays, especially in Amadeus. Equus and Yonadab. In these plays, Shaffer depicts the predicament one finds oneself in once the individual becomes an out cast, when this obsession becomes so eccentric as to make him/her unable to integrate with society.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityArdekani, Maryam Soleimanien_US
dc.format.extentvii, 44 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subject.lccPR6037.H23Z8 A73 1992en_US
dc.subject.lcshBibliogaphy:p. [41]-44.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRitual in literature.en_US
dc.titlePeter Shaffer's obsessional "myths/religions" : Amadeus, Equus and Yonadab from a psychoanalytic point of viewen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.departmentFaculty of Humanities and Lettersen_US
dc.publisherBilkent Universityen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US


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