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dc.contributor.advisorKohn, Edward P.
dc.contributor.authorAcehan, Işıl
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T20:05:46Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T20:05:46Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/28977
dc.descriptionAnkara : The Department of History of Bilkent University, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) -- Bilkent University, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references leaves 264-272.en_US
dc.description.abstractEarly twentieth-century America witnessed a large influx of immigrants largely from eastern and southern Europe as well as the Near East. The major “pull” factor stimulating the growth of migration was the rise of several American industries and a growing demand for laborers. In addition to the demand for immigrant labor, rising concern over political and economic conditions in the homeland resulted in a process of chain migration of Ottoman ethnic and religious groups from particular regions. By analyzing both “pull” and “push” factors triggering an out-migration from the Harput vilayet, as well as the migration trajectories of the Turkish immigrants, this dissertation argues that existing ethnic and social networks determined the settlement and employment patterns and inevitably affected the acculturation processes of Turkish immigrants in the United States. Specifically, this study contends that while the Turkish immigrants on the North Shore of Boston assimilated into American life, iv they also participated in the process of Turkish nation-building, maintained old home networks and transnational engagements.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAcehan, Işılen_US
dc.format.extentxviii, 288 pages, illustrationsen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.subjectOttoman Empireen_US
dc.subjectforeign relationsen_US
dc.subjectmigration/emigrationen_US
dc.subjectleather industryen_US
dc.subjecttransnationalismen_US
dc.subjectassimilationen_US
dc.subjectadaptationen_US
dc.subjectacculturationen_US
dc.subject.lccJV6465.A24 2010en_US
dc.subject.lcshMigration, internal--United States--History.en_US
dc.subject.lcshImmigrants--United States--History.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAssimilation (Sociology)--United States.en_US
dc.title"Made in Massachusetts" : converting hides and skins into leather and Turkish immigrants into industrial laborers (1860s-1920s)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US
dc.publisherBilkent Universityen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.itemidB123809


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