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dc.contributor.advisorOkyay, Ali Kemal
dc.contributor.authorKesim, Yunus Emre
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T18:27:59Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T18:27:59Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/15978
dc.descriptionAnkara : The Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering and The Graduate School of Engineering and Science of Bilkent University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references leaves 55-63.en_US
dc.description.abstractPlasmonics is touted as a milestone in optoelectronics as this technology can form a bridge between electronics and photonics, enabling the integration of electronics and photonic circuits at the nanoscale. Noble metals such as gold and silver have been extensively used for plasmonic applications due to their ability to support plasmons, yet they suffer from high intrinsic optical losses. Recently, there is an increased effort in the search for alternative plasmonic materials including Si, Ge, III-Nitrides and transparent conductive oxides. The main appeal of these materials, most of them semiconductors, is their lower optical losses, especially in the infrared (IR) regime, compared to noble metals owing to their lower number of free electrons. Other advantages can be listed as low-cost and control on plasma frequency thanks to the tunable electron concentration, i.e. effective doping level. This work focuses on atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown ZnO as a candidate material for plasmonic applications. Optical constants of ZnO are investigated along with figures of merit pertaining to plasmonic waveguides. It is shown that ZnO can alleviate the trade-off between propagation length and mode confinement width owing to tunable dielectric properties. In order to demonstrate plasmonic resonances, a grating structure is simulated using finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method and an ultra-wide-band (4-15 µm) infrared absorber is computationally demonstrated. Finally, an all ZnO microbolometer is proposed, where ALD grown ZnO is employed as both the thermistor and the absorber of the microbolometer which is an uncooled infrared imaging unit that relies on the resistance change of the active material (thermistor) as it heats up due to the absorption of incident electromagnetic radiation. The material complexity and process steps of microbolometers could be reduced if the thermistor layer and the absorber layer were consolidated in a single layer. Computational analysis of a basic microbolometer structure using FDTD method is conducted in order to calculate the absorptivity in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region (8-12 µm). In addition, thermal simulations of the microbolometer structure are conducted using finite element method, and time constant and noise-equivalent-temperature-difference (NETD) values are extracted.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityKesim, Yunus Emreen_US
dc.format.extentxvi, 63 leaves, tables, graphicsen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectPlasmonicsen_US
dc.subjectAlternative Plasmonic Materialsen_US
dc.subjectTransparent Conductive Oxidesen_US
dc.subjectMetal Oxidesen_US
dc.subjectZnOen_US
dc.subjectAtomic Layer Depositionen_US
dc.subjectFDTD Methoden_US
dc.subjectUncooled İnfrared İmagingen_US
dc.subjectMicrobolometeren_US
dc.subjectAll-ZnO Microbolometeren_US
dc.subject.lccQC176.8.P55 K47 2014en_US
dc.subject.lcshPlasmons (Physics)en_US
dc.subject.lcshPhotonics.en_US
dc.titleAld grown zno as an alternative material for plasmonic and uncooled infrared imaging applicationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Electrical and Electronics Engineeringen_US
dc.publisherBilkent Universityen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.itemidB147665


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