Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKayaci, F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOzgit Akgun, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDonmez, I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBiyikli, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorUyar, T.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015/07/28en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T12:04:16Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T12:04:16Z
dc.date.issued2012-10-22en_US
dc.identifier.citationKayaci, F., Ozgit-Akgun, C., Donmez, I., Biyikli, N., & Uyar, T. (2012). Polymer–inorganic core–shell nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition: Flexible nylon–ZnO core–shell nanofiber mats and their photocatalytic activity. ACS applied materials & interfaces, 4(11), 6185-6194.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1944-8244en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/13003
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of article.en_US
dc.description.abstractPolymer-inorganic core-shell nanofibers were produced by two-step approach; electrospinning and atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, nylon 6,6 (polymeric core) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning, and then zinc oxide (ZnO) (inorganic shell) with precise thickness control was deposited onto electrospun nylon 6,6 nanofibers using ALD technique. The bead-free and uniform nylon 6,6 nanofibers having different average fiber diameters (∼80, ∼240 and ∼650 nm) were achieved by using two different solvent systems and polymer concentrations. ZnO layer about 90 nm, having uniform thickness around the fiber structure, was successfully deposited onto the nylon 6,6 nanofibers. Because of the low deposition temperature utilized (200 °C), ALD process did not deform the polymeric fiber structure, and highly conformal ZnO layer with precise thickness and composition over a large scale were accomplished regardless of the differences in fiber diameters. ZnO shell layer was found to have a polycrystalline nature with hexagonal wurtzite structure. The core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats were flexible because of the polymeric core component. Photocatalytic activity of the core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats were tested by following the photocatalytic decomposition of rhodamine-B dye. The nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mat, having thinner fiber diameter, has shown better photocatalytic efficiency due to higher surface area of this sample. These nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats have also shown structural stability and kept their photocatalytic activity for the second cycle test. Our findings suggest that core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mat can be a very good candidate as a filter material for water purification and organic waste treatment because of their photocatalytic properties along with structural flexibility and stability. © 2012 American Chemical Society.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleACS Applied Materials and Interfacesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/am3017976en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2012 American Chemical Societyen_US
dc.subjectAuthor keywords ALD (atomic layer deposition); core-shell; electrospinning; nanofibers; nylon; photocatalytic activity; ZnO Indexed keywords ALD (atomic layer deposition); Core-shell; nylon; Photocatalytic activities; ZnO Engineering controlled terms: Deposits; Electrospinning; Fibers; Nanofibers; Photocatalysis; Polyamides; Polymers; Rayon; Shells (structures); Stability; Waste treatment; Water filtration; Water supply; Zinc oxide; Zinc sulfide Engineering main heading: Atomic layer deposition EMTREE drug terms: inorganic compound; nanomaterial; nylon; polymer; rhodamine; rhodamine B; zinc oxide EMTREE medical terms: article; catalysis; chemistry; electroplating industry; isolation and purification; light; materials testing; methodology; particle size; porosity; radiation exposure MeSH: Catalysis; Electroplating; Inorganic Chemicals; Light; Materials Testing; Nanostructures; Nylons; Particle Size; Polymers; Porosity; Rhodamines; Zinc Oxide Medline is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.en_US
dc.titlePolymer-inorganic core-shell nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition: flexible nylon-znO core-shell nanofiber mats and their photocatalytic activityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentInstitute of Materials Science and Nanotechnologyen_US
dc.citation.spage6185en_US
dc.citation.epage6194en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber4en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber11en_US
dc.instituteInstitute of Materials Science and Nanotechnologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/am3017976en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Societyen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record