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dc.contributor.authorZaim, K. K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T11:56:28Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T11:56:28Z
dc.date.issued1997-11en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-4215
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/10987
dc.description.abstractAn average of 15 million residents of the major cities in Turkey were exposed to particulate matter (PM10) and SO2 levels above the World Health Organization (WHO) standards in the 1990–1993 period. An assessment of the health effects due to particulate matter (PM10) and exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) suggests that, if annual PM10 and SO2 levels were reduced to WHO standards, this could have brought a reduction of 5940 and 5480 hospital admissions for respiratory diseases, 121,400 and 112,100 emergency room visits, 8.26 and 6.85 million restricted activity days and 57,000 and 73,000 cases of low respiratory symptoms in children 0–12 years of age in 1990 and 1993 respectively. The estimated annual economic value of avoiding these effects is nearly 0.12% and 0.08% of the 1990 and 1993 gross national product (GNP). Furthermore, the results show that, by attaining WHO air pollution standards, 3310 and 3060 lives could have been saved in 1990 and 1993 respectively. Copyright © 1998 Published by Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleEnergy policyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0301-4215(97)00124-9en_US
dc.subjectAir pollutionen_US
dc.subjectEconomic benefitsen_US
dc.subjectHealth benefitsen_US
dc.titleEstimation of health and economic benefits of air pollution abatement for Turkey in 1990 and 1993en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentBureau Management and Secretarial Trainingen_US
dc.citation.spage1093en_US
dc.citation.epage1097en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber25en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber13en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0140-6701(97)86002-Xen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US


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